• Print Page Content
Learning Area
2015 NCEA Assessment H...EnglishArts
Media
Year 9 MediaFilm Competitions 2011Year 10 MediaYear 11 MediaYear 12 MediaYear 13 MediaScholarshipFilm maker's pageStudent surveys and fe...Visual Arts
MusicPerforming Arts
Health and PELanguagesMathematics & BusinessScienceSocial SciencesTechnology
New SchoolLibraryHousesRumakiKey CompetenciesStudent Support 

Department ______________

GAT at WSC 2012 and looking forward to 2013

ISSUES TO BE RESOLVED…

 

  1. Definition (Gagne 2008)

    Giftedness designates the possession and use of outstanding natural abilities, in at least 1 ability domain, to a degree that places an individual at least among the top 10% of age peers.

    Talent designates the outstanding mastery of systematically developed abilities, called competencies (knowledge and skills) in at least 1 field of human activity to a degree that places an individual at least among the top 10% of age peers who are or have been active in that field.

    Do we as a school accept these definitions?                          Yes       No

    If No, how would you change the definitions? ________________________________________________________________

    We need a shared understanding of what giftedness means.

     

  2. Characteristics

What characteristics does your department look for in GAT students? _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Do you look at learning characteristics, creative characteristics, thinking characteristics, motivational characteristics, social leadership characteristics, self-determination characteristics ( Min of Ed handbook 2012)?

We know that GAT students learn at faster rates, manipulate abstract ideas and make connections, find, solve and act on problems more readily and can be very passionate about areas of strength/interest. They can also fail to complete work, give up due to boredom and may scrap work because they think it isn’t perfect.

 


 

3.      Identification

We need a shared understanding of how students can be identified.

How does your department currently identify GAT students? ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ Do you pre-test/above level test?

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Are you happy with a combination of teacher, Astle/PAT, Intermediate recommendation, parent/whanau recommendation, student and peer recommendation?      

                                                Yes                        No

We are looking at surveying students during form class in week 1 of term 1 2013 to gather data to use in conjunction with Intermediate reports, Asttle, PAT’s and another teacher survey towards the end of term 1 to help our identification process.

 

4.      Programmes

Programmes should be responsive, engaging and inclusive. If programmes provide a high level of challenge, students should identify themselves.

What programmes do you provide for GAT students?

Name in-class programmes, who are the students and at what levels? _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Name outside of class opportunities, who are the students and at what levels? _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Do you accelerate and if so who are they and at what levels? _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Do your unit plans cater for GAT students? Are students offered choices? Are there different levels of challenge available in the choices? Are the tasks explicit in the instructions to take the learning to a higher level? _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Do your lesson plans always focus on knowledge, or do they include applying, analysis, synthesis, evaluation? _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Are cultural considerations included? _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

A good resource is Webinar 2 on TKI “Teaching gifted and talented students in the NZ classroom”


5.        Self-Review

ERO Report 2012 looked at focusing inquiry (identifying learners needs), teaching inquiry (planning how to respond to them) and learning inquiry (evaluating how well programmes impact on learners).

Do you evaluate the relative success of the GAT students in your department? If so, how? _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 
The Media Studies Department caters for GAT students by:

*        Differentiated activities in unit plans.

*        Differentiation of process and/or product

In practical work students often differentiate themselves by the level to
which they are able to manage the camera and editing equipment and the speed
with which they complete tasks. This means that students are often working
on different activities, tasks and/or different stages of a task at one
time. Able students often assist others and we encourage them to do so.



Differentiation of product when completing tasks has been possible due to
the use of ICT and other modes of assessment ie using an oral delivery
accompanied by a powerpoint or presentation by video. This strategy is under
development. We have already offered it to students completing NCEA
assessments where the preparation is done over a period of time. Not many
students have taken it up - but it is an ongoing process and the feedback
from students who took it up was overwhelmingly positive. The introduction
of this strategy has been facilitated by the introduction of assessment
conditions for internal NCEA assessment which allow a variety of assessment
modes



*        Differentiation of task

For theoretical work we have been able to offer the use of intranet and
internet resources for the students to further their knowledge and skills in
a particular area of the standard



*        The fledging students' filmmakers club allows students to come at
lunchtime and after school to work on their own projects
*        The media studies blog set up in 2009 allows GAT students who are
interested in a particular area of the media to concentrate on that area and
pubish their findings (at the very early stages of development)
*        Competitions - Students are offered the chance to take part in
national and local film and digital media competitions. These are publicized
on the intranet and our blog
*        Scholarship - Students are identified early in Year 13 and utilize
face to face workshops, outside speakers, the intranet, a social bookmarking
network (delicious) to build to the scholarship examination at the end of
the year
*        Outside courses are publicized as they occur


Deb Thompson

H.O.D Media Studies


Mathematics

Gifted and talented:

 

Within class differentiation.

 While Students of Mathematics are banded, students within any class still have a range of abilities. Teachers in the department look to give extension for students who are: finding work easy, finishing work early or showing a high ability through their responses in class discussions. Extension work may be: harder problems, higher level material or activities that take could lead to more links to other topics being explored.

Outcome:  Students responded positively to this.

 

GAT group (year 9 group)

Selection criteria:

•        PAT result

•        Asstle testing results

•        Problem solving and logical thinking testing,

•        Work ethic

•        Interest

•        Willingness to participate

Each Y9 accelerate class teacher completed a grid with all of this info listed. The PAT, asstle and logic test are clear cut. The Work Ethic is teacher opinion while the interest and willingness to participate is up to the student.

 

Based on all the result, the top candidates are selected. This is followed by a conversation with the students and a letter home. Some students opt out as this stage and we are usually left with those who are truly able and up to the challenge.

 

What they did: Students spent an hour a week on Fridays with Craig Baily during term 3 and 4 researching and preparing presentations on a mathematical topic of their choosing.

Outcomes:  Students worked well on their presentations. Craig and the students were disappointed that the was no forum for their work to be presented.

 

Acceleration:

Students who show talent and a willingness to commit to extra work are given the opportunity to study for standards at a level above their current one.

Year 10

3 students were accelerated by being entered in all External Level 1 Achievement standards. 1 student was entered for 3 level 1 standards. Extra support was given by a combination of:  support by classroom teacher, work with another teacher off timetable and at lunchtime and holiday workshops.

Outcomes: 3 students sitting all level 1 External exams did very well achieve all stands at Excellence or Merit Level. They are sitting full AS Level 2 courses this year. The student who sat 3 external achieved Excellence in all. She is studying in a Level one course, but going to sit a currently undecided amount if Level  2 papers.

 

Y11

3 Students we accelerated by being entered in 3 Level 2 standards. Extra support was given in a similar way to the year 10 students.

1 Student started the year studying at Level 2 because of previous acceleration.

Outcomes: One student decided to drop the acceleration program. The two students who continues passed all standard with some merits.

 

Y12

1 student completed a full Y13 Calculus course as well as some Level 2 standards. He received extra support with KN once a week.

1 student completed a single Y13 Calculus standard. He received extra support once a week after school for the second half of the term.

Outcomes: The students sitting the full course achieved all standards at the highest level and will take an Auckland University Paper in Mathematics. The student sitting a single standard passed and will look to use his time to study other standards or prepare for scholarship.

 

Y13

Scholarship:

Student self-selection with some input from KN or HK was basis for the opportunity to sit these exams.

 

In calculus, students were tutored by Paolo Edgerton Bachmann. They mainly worked through old scholarship exam papers. This work was supported in the Calculus classroom through some addition topics taught and an emphasis on higher level thinking. Neither of the students had completed the max course for young scholars. This is a significant part of their preparation and hence these students were at a disadvantage compared to other candidates.

Outcomes: Neither student achieved this awards but the extra work impacted on their Level 3 Achievement.

 

In Statistics and Modeling Students were left to do much of their extra study in their own time but extra (after school) lessons were arranged in a rather ad-hoc way when necessary. An Intranet page was set up to allow students to work together in their preparation. This was not used well by the student.

Outcomes: A surprisingly successful result considering that the “course” could have been organized better. The candidates who succeeded were very strong.

 

Maths Publication:

Students have continued to take on more of the roll in the organization of Maths Uncensored. This year two year 12 students worked as editors and almost completely ran the whole production. Guidance and Proofing was provided by KN. The finished product is something everyone involved should be proud of.

 

Competitions

Simon and Vesi ran the competitions last year.

 

Mathex: We were very ably represented by teams at each of Year 9 and Year 10 level, competing against more than 100 other teams from schools throughout the greater Auckland region.  All teams put in a huge effort on the night, and achieved great scores in a competitive, fun and exhausting event.  Congratulations to all the participants for their enthusiasm, energy, determination and mathematical thinking under pressure!  A special prize was awarded to Marycarol for outstanding running, and special mention must go to the Y10 team of Caleb, Lucy, Hannah and Margot for the highest ever result achieved by a Western Springs team in the history of the competition!

 

ICAS: 16 students took part in the international UNSW Education Assessment in Mathematics (formally known as the ICAS Mathematics Competition), testing themselves against others throughout New Zealand and overseas in a special 1-hour assessment. Congratulations to all participants. Special acknowledgement goes to Alexander Swain (Y9) and Caleb Wells (Y10) for their Distinction awards.

 

 GEOGRAPHY

 In 2010, I aim to continue to promote scholarship Geography as a way to raise the profile of Geography as a subject and to teach GAT students higher level thinking skills.

To raise the profile of Geography as a subject that is interesting and capable of delivering high academic grades and extending GAT students.

Evaluation of 2009
1)   
Promotion of Scholarship Geography was successful and 5 students attended and enjoyed University lectures. The gifted and talented students identified themselves initially, encouraged by me, and as the year progressed,3 decided not to sit the actual exam, although their higher order skills improved.  2 students sat the exam and 1 student gained scholarship for the 3rd year in a row. The other student enjoyed the exam but ran out of time.

5)    Gifted and Talented students were catered for by class differentiation at Levels 1, 2 and 3, and Scholarship at Level 3. Only 1 or 2 students took the opportunity to gain Excellence at each level in internal assessments, by answering questions comprehensively, in depth and breadth. Students identify themselves by their superior geographic skills, knowledge and ideas.


Science Department

3.4      Special Abilities

The Science programme attempts to identify and nurture students with special abilities in science.  When used flexibly the curriculum offers talented students both acceleration and enrichment.

The Science Curriculum at Western Springs College provides opportunities for students with special abilities to:

    Identification of Students and Procedures for Identification

Identification of students as potential for inclusion in the Gifted and Talented Programme in the school, occurs early in the academic year, where teachers observe for the qualities outlined below. 
Asks many questions and challenges others thinking
Higher order mathematic skills

Teachers make assessment using a combination of methods and professional judgement.  These include observation of behaviour and performance in lessons, learning conversations with the students, analysing student work, AssTLe data, internal tests grades, evidence from extracurricular activities or student interests or information from previous schools or parent / guardian observations.

Their ability might be demonstrated through intellectual ability in Science or openly able behaviour, but teachers are mindful that students who have studied science in Intermediate school may appear more advanced than those who have not. Student ability may be difficult to spot due to concealed behaviour, where they are underachieving.  Students may be disruptive or rebellious as they become frustrated and are therefore are underachieving.  Students with creative ability may be intense or difficult but once captured they can demonstrate flair.  Teachers can miss students whose needs fit into the G&T criteria, due to a student having low motivation, disorganization, poor handwriting or poor social skills. 

Discussions with the Core Team teachers and the Dean will elicit other information and confirm teacher judgements or make teachers review their observations.  Student names are passed on to Jenny Jones for inclusion in the schools G&T Programme.

Provision in Lessons

Within science lessons, differentiated learning opportunities are incorporated, to challenge these students in terms of content, process and outcomes.  Evidence will be in the unit plans or individual teacher planning, but it may be subtle or explicit changes in teacher interactions with the student or learning opportunities provided or it may be documented in individual education plans.  Enrichment activities in lessons include visits from Futureintech scientists and outreach workers from Universities.

 

 

            Differentiation may take the form of:

  • Enrichment or extension through scientific activities or reading
  • Acceleration to a higher level within the Year Group or into a new Year Group.
  • Working with others of like ability or taking a leadership role
  • Encouraging independent learning by limiting support such as scaffolding.
  • Providing challenges with the unit of work or outside the main focus.
  • Use of ICT to research or present.
  • Differentiated opportunities in homework

 

            Evidence may take the form of:

  • Information and guidance in Unit Plans i.e. extension work, differentiated work, new material, reading
  • Individual lesson planning
  • Lesson observation
  • Differentiated resources
  • ICT resources
  • Individual IEP if students have them
  • Identification in teacher records

G& T Sustainability Group

Students in Year 9 identified by core class teachers to be part of the G&T group for Science, take part in a Sustainability Action Group.  Small groups of students are released from one science lesson on a rota to attend a programme run by the Science Department.

 

Opportunities Outside of the Classroom

Students who fall into the G&T criteria are given opportunities to be involved in activities outside of the classroom.  These activities may be just for students who need extension but may also be for other students who would benefit from the experiences as the Department has a clear focus of Science For All.  Activities to enrich student learning include:

  • Science , Make a Difference Science Camp
  •    

Refer to Special Abilities Guidance for Science Teachers: See Appendix

CATERING FOR GIFTED AND TALENTED STUDENTS IN COMMERCE

Junior (Year 10 Business Studies)

 Students are given many projects that allow them to extend themselves and
use their creativity and talents.  Market Day allows them to decide on their
own business idea, conduct market research, advertise their product, sell
these to the school and then write a report including Financial Statements
and reflections.



Furthermore, the class researches different investment options, tax options
and rates, buying a house, different entrepreneurs and are to decide and
discuss a business idea and how they could make it work if they inherited
money.



All these activities, allows students to study and research to their desired
level and depth.  Students are able to gain as much knowledge as they choose
since all these topics have many options and aspects to them.  Judging by
their ideas and questions, they certainly do enjoy learning as much as they
can about money.





Senior Courses



In the senior courses, the opportunity for GAT is in the Achievement
Standards the students decide to sit at the end per course.  Students are
able to have an overview of all Standards and then choose which ones they
will enroll into depending on their skills, interest and ability.



We do not have the time to go beyond our subject available Standards as the
senior classes already have a full course. However, students once again
choose to focus on either Achievement, Merit, or Excellence questions and
activities.  There are always a range of tasks available and so students are
easily able to move on and extend themselves once they have learnt a topic.



In Year 13, students are being offered to sit Scholarship if they feel they
are able to put in the extra effort and time. 

         Special Abilities including Gifted and Talented Students studying ESOL

 

Gifted and talented students are identified by

  • their ability to acquire the English language quickly.
  • their ability to ask questions.
  • complete work to a high standard within a short time frame

Gifted and talented students are catered for in a variety of ways depending on resources.

  1. They are mainstreamed if there English language in curriculum areas is sufficient.
  2. They are given computer programmes (in class) of advanced English grammar.
  3. They assist other students in peer marking activities which reinforces their learning.
  4. They are encouraged to enter for extra standards.
  5. Students are encouraged to read books in their first language so that their first language is retained.
  6. On completion of work they are given anchor tasks such as

  • Developing a Orientation booklet for new International students
  • Development of an international festival
  • Translating school rules into their first language
  • Attending other language classes to develop their language acquisition further.
  • Peer mentoring for younger ESOL students. This happens presently in an informal way but could be developed into a more formal system.
  • read books and listen to audio CDs to develop their language fluency.
  • The use of digistor.tki.org.nz and www.softwareforlearning.tki.org.nz (tki website), when passwords become available, provide good possible extension and breadth to students requiring extension. It has good visual, written and audio features.
  • Google earth

3.5 Differentiation

This can be achieved by carefully choosing topics that allow for multi-levelling and the possibility of some students being assessed at different levels of NCEA.

Teaching and learning strategies which recognize the range of learning needs in mixed ability classes include activities where students share information such as jig-saw activities, sequencing, matching, find someone who, concept stars, shared reading, three – level guides, dictogloss, and group activities involving shared outcomes.

The use of a teacher aide allow one on assistance for students who are at the foundation level at one or all of the language modes; speaking, listening, reading or writing.

Giving students anchor activities such as listening to CD while reading a book, or writing a manual for new International students.

Extension and / or independent work is possible when students work independently on spelling, grammar and speaking computer programmes which have been purchased and installed in the D1 computers. There is a laser printer in D1.

       

Level 1 Philosphy

 

The course seeks to introduce students to a range of philosophical concepts, themes and thinkers, as well as developing students’ philosophical skills and their ability to make connections across traditional subject boundaries.

The main aims of the course are to stimulate a love of learning and inquiry, and to develop a capacity to question – although success will also be acknowledged through NCEA credits.
Y10 Philosophy

This half-year course seeks to introduce students to a range of philosophical concepts, themes and thinkers, as well as developing philosophical ways of thinking.

It also aims to enable students to consider the world from a fresh perspective, to make connections across traditional subject areas, and to learn to question.

These are some of the areas that the course usually deals with:

Meta-Ethics

Is there such a thing as goodness? If so what does it mean to be “good”?

Ethical Systems

How can we decide what is the right thing to do? (Natural Law, Utilitarianism, Virtue Ethics.)

Materialism

Are there some things in the universe that go beyond matter, or is matter all that there is?

Philosophy of Religion

Does God exist? Is there life after death?

Critical Thinking

How do arguments work? How can they go wrong?

Philosophers

E.G. Aristotle, Aquinas, Confucius and The Stoics.

Year 10 Philosophy – Scheme for Term A

The Scheme is Flexible and should be varied accordingly to take accommodate variations in terms length and special events etc. Week 9 is a stand-alone topic and can be left out completely or transferred to Term B if necessary. Continuity and the full development of an understanding of the topics covered takes precedence over the completion of every detail of the scheme.

 

Week

Theme

Topic

Key Activity

Key Comps.

Resources

Notes and Review

Homework

1

Evil

Socratic Method

Pair/Group Discussion,

Definition Work

T LTS

Examples

Types of Evil Research

Nature of Evil

Discussion, Chalk & Talk,

Written Work

T LTS

Information/Task Sheet,

Homework, ICT

Typology of Evil

Homework feedback,

Whole Class Discussion

T RO PC

Book B7/8

2

Arguments

Basic Terms

Chalk and Talk,

Pair Work

T RO

Syllogisms

Pair Competition

T RO PC

Quiz Sheet

Syllogisms Challenge

Basic Arguments

Pair Work

T RO

Write-On Question Sheet

3

Moral Decision Making

Moral/Immoral/Amoral

Chalk & Talk, Discussion,

Written Work.

T LTS MS RO PC

Information/Task Sheet,

Homework

Individual and Societal Morality

4 Criteria

of Morality

4 Criteria Chart

4

Moral Decision Making in Practice

Morality of Boxing/Applying

Individual Q & A Work

T LTS MS

Text Sheet,

Question Sheet

Book B7/8

Boxing Essay

(Major HW)

Whole Class Discussion,

Essay Preparation

MS RO PC

Essay Research

T MS

ICT,

Planning Sheets

Book B7/8

5

Utilitarianism

Bentham’s

Felicific Calculus

Group Dictionary Research

T LTS RO PC

Dictionaries,

Task Sheet

Organise Groups of 3

Application to

Actual Situations

Group Discussion

T RO PC

Discussion Cards

Does Utilitarianism Work?

Video

T

Video and Player

Secure TV

6

Natural Law

Observing Nature –

Bird Courtship

DVD

T LTS

DVD and Player

Secure TV

Key Utilitarians Research

Natural Law

The Theory

Chalk & Talk,

Discussion

T

Set of Notes

Application to

Actual Situations

Group Discussion

T RO PC

Discussion Cards

Organise Groups of 3

7

Virtue Ethics

Excesses, Virtues

and Deficiencies

Groups Sorting Activity and Dictionary Research

T LTS

Dictionaries,

Task Sheet

Confucius Research

Application to

Actual Situations

Group Discussion

T RO PC

Discussion Cards

Different Sets

of Virtues

ICT Research

T MS LTS

ICT

Book B7/8

8

Capital Punishment

The Morality of

Capital Punishment

Review Last Homework,

Definition of Terms

T LTS

Capital Punishment Essay

(Major Homework)

Inner and Outer Circle Discussion

MS RO PC

Divide Class in 2

Essay Preparation,

Essay Research

T MS

Fact Sheets,

ICT

Book B7/8

9

Civility and Morality

Do/How Do Morality and Civility Differ?

Individual Written Q & A Work

T LTS MS

Text Sheet,

Question Sheet

Inner and Outer Circle Class Discussion

MS RO PC

Divide Class in 2

Revision

Spare Lesson/

Catch Up

TBA

10

Examination

Revision

Revision Quiz,

Student Questions

T MS

Revision Quiz

Examination

Timed Written Paper

T LTS MS

Exam Paper

Feedback

Returned Papers,

Class Discussion,

T LTS MS

 


Year 10 Philosophy – Scheme for Term B

The Scheme is Flexible and should be varied accordingly to take accommodate variations in terms length and special events etc. Week 7 and 8 are stand-alone topics and can be left out completely if necessary. Continuity and the full development of an understanding of the topics covered takes precedence over the completion of every detail of the scheme

Week

Theme

Topic

Key Activity

Key Comps.

Resources

Notes and Review

Homework

1

Thinking Skills

Necessary and Sufficient Conditions

Group Competition

T MS RO PC

Quiz Sheet

Organise Groups of 3

Newspaper Research

Coincidental and Causal Connections

Group Discussion/Work

T RO PC

Information/Task Sheet

Assumptions

Individual Written Exercise

T LTS MS

Write-On Task Sheet

2

Pascal’s Wager

Pascal’s Wager

Sorting Activity,

Class Discussion

T RO PC

Pascal Chart Sheets, ICT

Evaluating

Pascal

Essay research and Writing

T LTS MS

ICT,

Core Textbooks

Book B7/8

Pascal’s Wager

Essay

(Major Homework)

3

Death and the Afterlife

Key Terms Definition

Chain Definitions Work in Pairs on ICT

T LTS RO PC

Book B7/8

Different Views on Life After Death

Chalk & Talk,

Class Discussion

T LTS RO PC

Is Death a Good Thing?

Group Discussion,

‘Y’ Chart

T RO PC

Core Textbooks

4

Death and the Afterlife

What Happens After

Death

Inner and Outer Circle

Class Discussion

MS RO PC

Discussion Groups

Personal View on Life After Death Write Up

Mind/Body Issue

Video

T

Video

Book TV

Spare Lesson/

Catch Up

5

Arguments for the Existence of God

The Argument From Degrees

Chalk and Talk,

Exemplar

T LTS

PowerPoint,

Data Projector

Secure Data Proj.

Existence of God Research

(Major Homework)

Arguments for the Existence of God Research

Research Using ICT and Hard Copy Sources,

PowerPoint Production

T LTS MS

Instruction Sheet,

ICT,

Core Textbooks

Book B7/8

6

Arguments for the Existence of God

” ”

” ”

” ”

” ”

” ”

” ”

Arguments for the Existence of God presentations

Presentations to Class by Pairs of Students

T LTS MS RO PC

Student PowerPoint’s,

Data Projector

Secure Data Projector

7

Materialism

Definitions Around Materialism

Pairs Definition Work

T LTS RO

Core Text Books,

Definitions Sheet

Revision

Implications of Materialism

Chalk & Talk,

Note Taking

T MS

Are You a Materialist?

Inner and Outer Circle Class Discussion

MS RO PC

Divide Class in 2

8

Student Choice Week – Theme and Content to be decided at the Time

9

Examination

Revision

Revision Quiz,

Student Questions

T MS

Revision Quiz

Examination

Timed Written Paper

T LTS MS

Exam Paper

Feedback,

Course Review Forms

Returned Papers,

Class Discussion

T MS LTS

10

Short Term or Activities Week

 

       

CATERING FOR GIFTED AND TALENTED STUDENTS

In English, we are able to identify our gifted and talented students by looking at asTTle, PATs and past year assessment data. Most classroom teachers do this at the beginning of the teaching year, but our motivation is more to identify students who are likely to require additional support. Identifying gifted and talented students is not a process that is centralised within the department and that is something we will look to address in the future. Identifying where these students are and what their strengths are may help us to develop targeted strategies that could be adapted for different texts/topics. Individual classroom teachers respond to requests for information about gifted and talented students from Jenny Jones, the GAT co-ordinator, when these requests are made.

In 2012, four members of the department were involved in the Differentiation PLC. We developed model resources (which were then shared with the department) to demonstrate ways of making tasks more accessible to lower ability students as well as giving gifted and talented students the ability to go far beyond what is stated in our junior criteria.

· Ali Geursen introduced the SOLO taxonomy to the department as an ideal framework for us to begin with, and she worked with Miriam Kent to produce a model assignment using The Hunger Games at year 10. The assignment was structured in a way that meant students were working at a pace that suited them, with some students mastering basic skills while others worked independently in the library on more challenging tasks.

· Rachel Williamson and I, as part of our differentiation work, scaffolded the year 10 research task to ensure all students were going through a clear process where each step was explicitly taught and its importance understood. Gifted and talented students would be able to transfer these skills not only to their future research in English but to other subjects and situations. We are attempting to give them the tools to be successful in a variety of contexts. We have shared this work with the Science department as part of this year’s work with the Literacy Lead Team.

· As part of his PLC work, David Larsen applied the principles of differentiation to two units. The first one involved building SOLO into a literacy circle approach to teaching a novel to his Year 10 class. This gave both gifted students the chance to exercise and model higher thinking skills, and less able students the chance to benefit from this modelling and apply it in their own work. The second unit was a cross-curricular project with Logan Coleman in Science, where talented visual-spatial thinkers were given an alternative assessment method for their chemistry unit - a comic book task. This meant that a wider variety of learning styles, or "multiple intelligences", were accommodated for in teaching and assessment.

· Outside of the differentiation PLC, May Lee Allen created an excellence differentiated assignment for her year 11 novel study, in Te Reo and English.

These are just examples of where we are catering not only for our less able students but for those with more developed skills in our subject.

When considering our senior programme, a highlight with the alignment has been the Significant Connections standard, where students are forced to make links between their studied texts and the world beyond. We have seen some mature and insightful work from gifted and talented students, showing their desire to go far beyond what is necessary. Colleagues comment that the work is sometimes university standard.

David Larsen ran our Scholarship programme last year, and all four students (two girls and two boys) who attended all of his sessions were successful in the exam, with one of these (Ella Wheeler) being an Outstanding Scholarship. We are grateful to have David’s broad knowledge and enthusiasm, and we look forward to seeing the outcome of this year’s programme, which has started off with 16 fabulous students.

Debating and Writers’ Group also offer opportunities for gifted and talented students to apply English skills beyond the classroom. It was what we could call a ‘consolidation’year for debating in 2013 but we have a keen group this year who have made a confident start. The Writers’ group has also started with great gusto, with the guidance of Miriam Kent and Dave Burton. We took 18 students to the annual Writers and Readers Festival at The Edge in May 2012 and we have 30 places booked for this year’s event.

B

--
Belinda Develter

HOD English

Western Springs College

Motions Road

Auckland 1022

Ph: 815 6730 ext 731

 

Reply

Forward

 

 

Thanks for your report back to us as a staff. I feel in the Performing Arts we do not do enough currently to support our G and T students. Our extra curricular activites are sound and extremely beneficial but I think we could do a lot more and excel more academically if we had something organised even just in the Junior school.

 

Attached is the relevant G and T comments from this years Dance Report... In our Dance Report meeting with Ken and Ruth we discussed the Senior G and T (year 14) Dance class idea and it was decided that, based on numbers, we wouldn't be following through with it in the immediate future. Junior Dance G and T was considered. Chloe and I both would like time to develop these ideas further (eg the word Academy seems a little elitist so we would have to look at a more appropriate name to call the class)

 

Also in the report...

"Gifted and Talented students were identified in Term Three 2012 although not a lot was done once the students were identified. In 2013, a Gifted and Talented programme/action plan should be implemented as it is concerning that we as a department may be losing some dancers with potential. Talented dancers in the school such as Sophie McIntosh and Gwen De Leon have chosen not to take Dance in 2013. In order to cater for these student needs I believe a separate programme/course should be implemented that aligns different assessment standards, an emphasis on scholarship, more performance opportunities and more community interaction. I must note that showcases, dance competitions and trips are very beneficial in motivating these students. We have great extra curricular dance opportunities at Western Springs College for students to extend themselves outside of class. In 2012 students had opportunities to dance in the school production (West Side Story), TAPAC classes, In 2013 I aim to provide more oppertunites to get engaged with dance such as

- Entering students into SDNZ Hip Hop competitions (a less controversial and higher caliber option over Bring It On)

- A Junior lunchtime dance group led by a senior student

- “Boys Dance”

- A flashmob

- Stage Challenge (run by Kirsty Britton but I will support this in a big way)

 

 

 









 
Sub Pages:
There are currently no sub pages set with access for this page.